September 20th, 2020

Could ATA’s compensation model be the answer for province’s doctors?

By Letter to the Editor on August 12, 2020.

The Alberta Medical Association should seriously consider the compensation model for Alberta teachers for its profession.

The salaries are the highest in northern Canada according to Statistics Canada, a range from $ 59,500 to $94,100 (2017 – 2018). Beginning teachers will receive an annual increment estimated at four to six per cent for eight consecutive years, or more.

Benefits will be at least 20 per cent of the gross salary, including a defined-benefit pension plan and group insurance. Professional development days are provided during weekdays and at full salary.

Retirement is possible after age 55 with at least 30 years of experience and with a government-guaranteed pension about 70 per cent of the highest salary. CPP benefits are payable at age 65. 

Various leaves of absence with pay should include vacation for at least two months. Time off should be scheduled on the weekends and/or weekdays.

The government should exempt the profession from any malpractice litigation. Tenure should also be made available for qualifying doctors. Hours of work and the number of patients per shift should be negotiable.

The AMA and the Ministry of Health should be able to negotiate reasonable salaries and benefits for the different disciplines. The government has considerable experience in order to cover the costs of incurred practice overheads.

This new approach should convince Alberta doctors that their current model is replaceable, and what is good for Alberta teachers should be good for Alberta doctors.

Larry Samcoe

Medicine Hat

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Fedup Conservative
Fedup Conservative
1 month ago

After Jason Kenney and Tyler Shandro whined about the high cost of health care and blamed it on our doctors now they are promising to make some doctors richer with privatization . How stupid do they think we are? Sadly they know it they got elected didn’t they.
After slashing taxes to benefit their rich friends and making the financial mess were are in a lot worse they spread the lie that this increase in cost to taxpayers will be paid out of the public purse. How when we are so broke? I bet they have no intention of paying it. This is all about umping the cost of health care onto the backs of the people like Klein did with the power industry.
The fact is as retired doctors pointed it out when Klein tried it. It’s just one more step in helping the rich get first choice of our health care system and creating a nightmare for the rest of us.
It’s what Reformers do as former conservative MLAs taught me. Looking after their own well being and that of their rich friends is their number one mandate, you can’t trust them.

fd4thought
fd4thought
1 month ago

Surely this letter is a joke or meant as sarcasm. The two professions are in no way comparable and the suggestion that a remuneration model for teachers could apply to the medical community is beyond absurd.

ijs
ijs
1 month ago

2020/08/14
Health Minister Shandro has identified salaried doctors as an alternative to the current fee-for-service model for compensating physicians. A recent publication on doctor compensation by the Fraser Institute discusses three models, the two aforementioned ones and capitation. The salaried-doctors model enables direct control of costs, but the system requires terms which will ensure “quantitative and qualitative” output.

The OECD reports on the compensation in some thirty countries with universality and accessibility as their main principles of their health care systems. Some countries have only one system of the three models, other countries have a mix of the three models. A variety of models are used in different settings.

The teachers’ model is highlighted to identify what terms the Alberta Government has accepted in its collective agreement with this profession. If the AMA and the Alberta Government negotiate a salaried model, the physicians become employees of the government. The teachers’ agreement can be referenced for negotiable items; however, any final agreement will be what is agreed by both parties.

fd4thought
fd4thought
1 month ago

Alberta physicians have had the option of opting out of fee for service and like our OB/Gyn group here in Palliser choosing an ARP or salaried model. I await statistics which have been requested under FOIP, but understand from numerous sources this has produced an environment with little incentive to work, long wait times for consults and a number of locums required for on call duties. In response i suppose the above suggestion on quantitative and qualitative output measures addresses this in theory, but in reality how is qualitative output measured.

ijs
ijs
1 month ago

2020 08 17

The publication by The Fraser Institute used these descriptive words, “quantitative and qualitative”. Both descriptions should be measurable. An agreement would set minimum standards for the number of patient visits and for procedures performed. The reporting system accounts for the physician’s performance, that is, the actual number of visits. The same system could identify the codes for these different visits and especially for the procedures. A physician could avoid the more challenging procedures with a higher risk for ones with virtually no risk. It is reasonable that any agreement would require a balanced practice. This agreement empowers the state to control performance.